The New Today
Local News

Grenadian attorney: Look at the Jamaica model to fight Covid-19

Several persons came out to the National Stadium in Queen’s Park to be vaccinated against Covid-19

An attorney-at-law in Grenada has called on the Keith Mitchell-led government in St George to take a look at the Covid-19 measures put in place by Jamaica to help fight the deadly virus as cases continue to soar out of proportions in Grenada.

In an exclusive interview with THE NEW TODAY, the attorney suggested that the administration should look at introducing the staggered days for business to open and close as part of a lockdown of the country to handle the rising number of Covid-19 cases on a daily basis.

He described this as “a great suggestion” from the Andrew Holness government in Kingston but for some reason the bottom line in Grenada with the Mitchell government is seemingly focused more on economics.

“…We are in a very bad place (with Covid-19),” he said

According to the lawyer, he is getting the feeling that despite the spike in Covid cases on the island, the Mitchell-led ruling New National Party (NNP) administration is putting economic and financial concerns over the wellbeing of citizens.

“I think most Grenadians will say shut it (the island) down, our lives are more important than any Accountant’s Ledger, no budget line could be as important as the lives of our citizens,” he said.

Related:  Major security breaches at new prison on Grand Anse beach

“It’s really unfortunate… it means that we are not putting the lives of our people first,” he added.

Grenada has seen Covid-19 cases increase by an average of 40 per day.

The attorney-at-law charged that government’s consideration at the moment should not be on keeping the country open to service major carriers like American Airlines and Jet Blue of the United States as well as British Airways and Virgin Atlantic from the United Kingdom.

He pointed at recent statements made by the Minister of Health, Nickolas Steele that government cannot afford to shut the country down, which in simple terms means it is based on “a financial calculation” and not the health and wellbeing of Grenadians.

“These are not the considerations that one should be looking at when it comes to your citizens’ life,” he remarked.

“There are cries that the economy is more important than the lives of our citizens – you are hearing that from so many different people,” he said.

Tourism and attracting foreign investors from the sale of passports through the controversial Citizenship By Investment (CBI) programmes are the main plank of the Grenadian economy under Prime Minister Mitchell.